10 CONNECTED PRINTS

10 CONNECTED PRINTS: Place, Space and Time: the relationship between experience, memory and embodiment in photography


Project Description

A photograph, on its own, may be seen as a specific instance derived from the flow of experience and phenomena. A photograph is often thought of as being a slice out of time. Yet, the experience of looking at a photograph as part of a continuum. A photograph sets of memories, visual delight, offers a window into the experience of others, bears witness to some event, stands as a trigger for a string of thoughts, captivates through tonal and color arrays, and so on. No matter what the specifics of when the photograph was ‘taken’ or what the photograph ‘presents’, it usually offers a spectrum for understanding and interpretation that is very open-ended.

This project brings us to consider how the photographic message may be made more specific. An idea, or emotions, or events, may be more clearly rendered in sequences of photographs. Photographic sequences may be designed with their own lexicons, and can draw from cultural visual symbols and metaphors.  In other words, we will consider how a sequenced set of photographs can render an experience, how to create photographic poems. Sequences can be made to represent things that are not evident in the shape of the image, but are evident in the relationships between images. Consequently, this project is about relationships. 

The project will be carried out using film-based cameras and traditional wet-lab processes. This will allow students to learn about the fundamental technical and aesthetic principles of photography.

Assignment

Using negatives produced since the beginning of this semester (and only these), select and enlargement-print 10 images. The final prints will be enlarged, largely uncropped from the original negative, sequenced and exhibited on walls. A 200 to 300-word written statement analyzes the project by addressing all of the following issues:

  • What are the fundamental and most general concerns expressed in the work?
  • Give a clear example of how any one component of the piece addresses sequence.
  • Describe some aspect of the work that you had not been aware of until after having completed the project.
  • Refer to other photographer(s) whose work may have an impact on this project.

Submission of the Project

1. Prints should be trimmed so that it has a white border  of at least 1/8 inch on all sides.

2. The verso of each image must have written in pencil, in the lower left corner:

Your name
sequence number (1 to 10, reading from left to right or top to bottom)
(Title, if used)
Art <class>, <semester>  <YYYY>

e.g. 

Pradip Malde
#3
Art261, Fall 2020

3. The Statement is to be emailed, as a document attachment, to the instructor before the start of the final critiques. The email subject (as well as the attached file if submitting as such) should be named

<YourlastnameFirstinitial_10connected_Satement.doc>
e.g. MaldeP_10connected_Satement.doc

The statement should have the standard heading:

First Last Name
Statement
Art <class> – 10 Connected Prints
<Fall or Spring, YYYY>

followed by the body of the statement.


Description of goals and grading rubric:

Consolidate the relationship between pre-visualization and expression, as well as that between conceptual purpose and creative expression;
become proficient with core photographic processes;
establish an awareness of working with the fundamentals of photographic technology;
consolidate skills in wet-lab (traditional) photographic practices;
learn to critique photographic works ;
learn to write an artist statement.


Assessment Criteria:

Technical Skills:
Overall familiarity with film-based photographic processes, tools and materials

Expressive Skills: Awareness of form in terms of single images and sequenced images
Evidence of the relationship between idea and graphic elements

Analytic Skills: To what extent does the work and the written project statement address the following

• Establish general, cohesive concerns. 

• Addresses sequence. 

• Considers the single image as a core building block.
• Identifies some aspect of the work that becomes apparent after having completed the project.
• Refers work by other photographers

Recursive Skills: assesses VISUAL literacy and indicates the assimilation of technical, expressive and analytic skills through engagement.
Regular attendance of classes
Participation in the critique

Grading Rubric for 10 Connected Prints
Place, Space and Time: the relationship between experience, memory and embodiment in photography

Student name: Overall grade for project: 


Using negatives produced since the beginning of this semester (and only these), select and enlargement-print 10 images. The final prints will be enlarged, largely uncropped from the original negative, sequenced and exhibited on walls. A 200 to 300-word written statement analyzes the project must follow guidelines as described in the project assignment description.


+ = excellent – = needs some attention
√ = good \ = needs a lot of attention

o = satisfactory x = inadequate or incomplete


Technical Skills:
☐Proficiency with camera exposure and film processing
☐Proficiency with contact and enlargement printing methods and processes

☐Proficiency safe and healthy darkroom practices

Expressive Skills:

☐Awareness of form in terms of single images and sequenced images
☐Evidence of the relationship between idea and graphic elements

☐Indication of relationship between tone, shape, symbol and metaphor

Analytic Skills: To what extent does the work and the written project statement address the following
☐General, cohesive concerns

☐Addresses relationship between sequence and single image
☐Identifies some aspect of the work that becomes apparent after having completed the project.
☐Refers to other work


Recursive Skills: indicates the assimilation of technical, expressive and analytic skills through engagement

☐Regular and engaged attendance

☐Engaged Participation in the critique